Italy

Medical insurance is most important to employees in Italy. Private medical insurance helps employees avoid long waiting lists associated with the state-provided medical care, and can provide tax benefits. When asked to rank four other common benefits in order of importance a typical Italian employee will say: Disability, Death, Long Term Care and Retirement

Asinta Partner
Alessandro de Besi

De Besi-Di Giacomo

More Info

Average Cost

There is none because the employee’s age, location, and job position affect the rates markedly.

Employee benefits in Italy are based on a company’s sector (and associated labor contracts) as well as an employee’s gender, age, salary level and location. This is true for both mandatory employee benefits in Italy and supplementary employee benefits.

Mandatory Employee Benefits in Italy

Mandatory employee benefits in Italy are highly complex, and the information below is a simplified outline to give employers a basic idea about some of the required benefits. It is by no means an exhaustive list.

  • All Italian citizens are entitled to the national health system. Employers and employees contribute to this system.
  • Employees in Italy must make a mandatory pension contribution which can differ by type of activity or profession. Employers and employees contribute to this system.
  • Employees must be covered for accidents at work through the mandatory state insurance program which is managed by the national institute for accidents at work. The system has the right of recovery from the employer for any accident caused by employer negligence. Employers contribute to this system.
  • Regarding short-term sickness, all employees are entitled to have their salary paid by the NHS. The exception is the first three days, which must be paid by the employer, but not more than five times a year. From day three to day 21 of a short-term sickness, employees receive 50% of their salary, and then it changes again after day 21. The benefit amount depends on the level of employment. Employers contribute to this system.

It is also important to know that individual labor contracts in certain sectors oblige an employer to buy specific insurances.

 

Supplementary Employee Benefits

When setting up benefit plans for Italian employees you need to be aware of what the collective labor contracts provide for certain levels of employment. There are many national collective agreements for each sector and it is important to ascertain which sectors the employer is part of, and therefore which level of contract rules must be applied. There are two primary sectors that drive most of the basis for labor contracts. The first is the industries that manufacture pharmaceuticals. The second is commerce that includes technical services and IT.

Four employee groups drive benefit design in each sector. The employee groups are executives, middle managers, employees, and blue-collar workers.

Executives in the Industrial Sector

Life Insurance

For life insurance the executive must be insured for a sum of €200,000 in case of death or total disability if they are single, and for €300,000 for a family.

Personal accident insurance

For personal accident insurance the employer must buy executives coverage for five times the annual gross salary (AGS), and six times the AGS asked for permanent disability.

Medical Insurance

The employer must enroll executives and their families into the FASI fund which pays medical expenses up to a certain limit. This fund is usually handled through payroll.

Long-Term Care Insurance

Employers have no obligations for this.

Retirement

The employer must set up an integrative plan through a pension fund (usually Previndai) which pays 4% of the annual gross salary into the fund, and the employee pays the same amount out of pocket. There are some companies that integrate the best contribution with a higher percentage. On top of this, the employee can ask the employer to pay his TFR (severance fund) into the same pension plan.

 

Middle Managers, Employees, and Blue-Collar Workers in the Industrial Sector

For this employee level, there is no obligation for the employer to provide life insurance, personal accident, medical, or long-term care.

Retirement
These plans are based on different sub-sectors and contracts like pharmaceuticals, chemical, and so forth, and there are many rules. The main rule you should follow is that if there are more than 50 employees, the employer is obliged to play DTFR (severance fund) into a pension fund or into the INPS (Italian institute of social security). For under 15 employees a company can have an individual company agreement.

 

Executives in the Commerce Sector

There is a formula employers should follow when it comes to executives in the commerce sector. They should be enrolled into Fondo Antonio Pastore which covers the following benefits:

  • Life Insurance where the insured amount is related to age and gender and decreases with the increase of age
  • Permanent disability by illness
  • Permanent total disability by illness and accident
  • Permanent total disability granting the payment of the savings account
  • Long term care
  • Unemployment coverage
  • Savings account

This fund is usually handled through payroll.

Personal Accident

Employers should also buy personal accident insurance for death at five times AGS and for permanent disability at six times AGS.

Medical Insurance

The employer must enroll an executive and his family into the FASDAC fund which pays the medical expenses up to a certain limit. This fund is usually handled through payroll.

Retirement

The employer must set up through a pension fund (usually Mario Negri) and integrative plan paying 4% of the annual gross salary into the fund and the employee must pay the same amount (4%) out of pocket. Some companies integrate the basic contribution with a higher percentage. On top of this, the employee can ask the employer to pay the TFR (severance fund) into the same pension plan. This fund is usually handled through payroll

 

Middle Managers in Commerce Sector

Employers have no obligations for life insurance, personal accident insurance, or long-term care insurance.

Medical

Employers must enroll middle managers only into the QUAS fund, which pays the medical expenses up to a certain limit. This fund is usually handled through payroll

Retirement

Retirement is based on different sub-sectors contracts, so the rules are vast. The main one to know is that if there are 50 employees or more, the employer must pay into the TFR (severance fund), into a pension fund, or into the INPS (Italian Institute of Social Security). Employers with under 50 employees is subject to individual company agreement.

 

Employees in the Commerce Sector

Employers have no obligations to employees in the commerce sector for life insurance, personal accident insurance, medical insurance, or long-term care insurance.

Retirement

Retirement is based on different sub-sectors contracts, so the rules are vast. The main one to know is that if there are 50 employees or more, the employer must pay into the TFR (severance fund), into a pension fund, or into the INPS (Italian Institute of Social Security). Employers with under 50 employees are subject to individual company agreement.

 

Related Government Websites

 

This information about employee benefits in Italy is provided by De Besi-Di Giacomo, Asinta’s employee benefits consulting Partner in Italy.

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